2017 Week 14 Newsletter

Labor Lull


We are experiencing a welcome lull in the amount of labor required on the farm in late summer.  Late summer harvesting of fruiting vegetables is a lot easier than early season greens.  And there are not as many plants being put in the ground for fall and even the weeds seem to be cooperating.  (Not that there aren't always weeds to pull - but at least now they aren't threatening to take over entire crops!)  Paul even slept in until 6 am this morning before heading out the Saturday Shelton Farmers' Market - so much more pleasant than a 4 am wake-up!  So - our hope for you this Labor Day Weekend is that you all can take a minute to slow down and enjoy the last of the summer season.  Fall and school and crazy schedules will be here soon enough.  We can all use a lull in the labor.

 Taking a break from farming - relaxing on the swing.

Taking a break from farming - relaxing on the swing.

CSA Basket - Week 14

Your CSA basket this week includes the following:

Zucchini - Black Star or Costata Romanesco or Yellow Crookneck
Tomatoes - the varieties we chose this year are best eaten fresh.  The large ones make a wonderful, fresh tasting caprese with fresh mozzarella and basil.
Melons - New this week!  Either an heirloom type called Prescott Fond Blanc (pretty name - ugly fruit!) -or- a cantaloupe bred for growing in specifically here in the PNW called Eel River Melon - both are tasty!
Kale Mix - cut out the ribs, roll it, and slice into thin chiffonade ribbons - massage with your favorite flavored balsamic vinaigrette and season with salt and pepper
Shintokawa Cucumbers - try the quick pickle recipe with a sweet pepper - perfect on a salad on a hot day
Tri-color Carrots - these are a nice size for roasting - I saw a recipe this week for roasted carrots with a honey cumin glaze - I think I will try it!
Collards - saute with onions for a nice side dish
Cabbage - Perfect for a coleslaw for your Labor Day Picnic
Chioggia Beets - Beautiful white and red concentric circles when sliced!  See recipe below
Peppers -  The sweet peppers are tasty fresh or try them pickled, too!

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Veggie of the Week:
Cantaloupe!

 Precott Fond Blanc Melon - try eating them with a splash of lemon juice or a sprinkle of salt for an extra dash of flavor

Precott Fond Blanc Melon - try eating them with a splash of lemon juice or a sprinkle of salt for an extra dash of flavor

Botanical Facts - Melons belong to a genus of about 25 species of climbing or trailing annuals in the pumpkin family (Curcubitceae).  These sweet dessert melons are annual vines that produce round fruit up to 8 inches in diameter.  Their skin can vary from smooth to netted to thick and scaly depending on the variety.
Historical Origins - The wild ancestors of Cucumis melo were native to a region of Iran and northwest India.  They have been cultivated since ancient times in Egypt and the Middle East, but were not introduced to Europe until the fifteenth century.  Marco Polo notes tasting one in a Persian market in the 13th century but he did not bring them back to Europe. The name "cantaloupe" comes from the Italian region where they were first cultivated on a large scale in Europe - Cantalupa - which literally means "wolf cry".  


Beets and Greens with Citrus Dressing


I love that fact that you get a root vegetable and a healthy, tasty green with beets.  This recipe takes advantage of both. Makes four servings.

Ingredients:

  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 inch peeled ginger, chopped 
  • 2 Tbsp orange juice
  • 1 tsp lemon juic
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • salt and pepper
  • 1 bunch beets
  • beet greens, coarsely chopped
  • 1 Tbsp blue cheese

1. Mix garlic, ginger, orange juice, lemon juice, salt and pepper in a jar.  Cover and shake.  Add olive oil and set aside.

2. Place beets in a pot and cover with cold water.  Boil until tender when pierced with a fork.  Transfer to a plate to cool.

3. Squeeze garlic out of skins and mash to make a paste.  Squeeze lemon juice and pulp into bowl.  Stir in honey and rosemary.

4.  Using the same water, boil the coarsely chopped beet greens until tender - 5 or 6 minutes.  Drain and let cool.

5. Peel the beets and cut into wedges.  Squeeze excess water from beet greens

6.  Arrange greens on a plate and top with beets and drizzle dressing on top.  Sprinkle with chunks of blue cheese.


  Peck of Pickled Peppers   We had extra peppers that came home from the market last week - so I got busy and pickled them.  One is fresh pickled (prettier green) and the other two I processed for shelf storage.  They will be tasty this winter on salads or toppings for pizza.

Peck of Pickled Peppers

We had extra peppers that came home from the market last week - so I got busy and pickled them.  One is fresh pickled (prettier green) and the other two I processed for shelf storage.  They will be tasty this winter on salads or toppings for pizza.

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Soaking up the Rays


Here is the flower I promised you last week!  I hope everyone gets a chance to sit back and relax this weekend and enjoy a little lull in the labor!  Follow the example of the sunflower and go soak up some rays before the rains begin.  Don't forget to come see us at the market!

Your SVF Farm Team