2018 Week 2 Newsletter

Rain, Respite, and Rainbows

WAIT! What's that wet stuff coming from the sky? Oh - how soon we forget! The rain on Friday was a nice respite here on the farm - rain makes it harder to get things done - so naturally, things slow down a bit, too. Thankfully, the rain fell on a harvest day and most harvesting can still be done in the rain. And the good news - you can't really effectively weed in the rain. That means the weeds got a respite, too. So, after a surprisingly hot and gorgeous May it looks like we are in for more typical PNW June weather. But, don't forget to look for the rainbows after the rain. 

PLUVIOPHILE: a lover of rain; someone who finds joy and peace of mind during rainy days.

Enjoy some photos of the baby produce. These tiny little guys are just waiting to turn into tasty fruits of summer. Not long now! A baby watermelon, Shintokawa cucumber, Shisito pepper, and Aunt Molly's ground cherry.


CSA Basket - Week 2

Here is what you can expect to find in a large share basket this week:

  • Basil* - great so many ways - try in pesto with the carrot tops 
  • French Breakfast Radish* - very mild radish - slice and enjoy on a baguette with butter
  • Salad Mix* - grate the carrots on top and a few snips of basil with your favorite dressing
  • Carrots* - fresh carrots taste so alive! Save the tops to make a nice, carroty flavored pesto
  • Shallots/Scallion* - I adore pickled shallots on a salad - easy to do a quick pickle in just 15 minutes
  • Mustard Greens - tender and spicy - great in a stir-fry
  • Green/Red Napa Cabbage - see recipe ideas below
  • Strawberries - yes, a repeat, sorry!
  • Tatsoi - chop and enjoy with farm fresh eggs for breakfast
  • Nasturtium Blossoms - tastes like a radish - gorgeous on a salad or chop and mix into cream cheese for a sandwich spread
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 Our resident mouser, Patches, on her rounds near the barn.

Our resident mouser, Patches, on her rounds near the barn.


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Vegetable of the Week - Basil

Historical Origins - Basil (Ocimum basilica) is a native plant of the Old World tropical regions but has been used across the Old World for thousands of years. In Italy it is used widely in cuisine and as in courting where it was worn differently depending on a woman's status. In India, a variety called Holy Basil (Ocimum sanctum) is a venerated herb that is mentioned in ancient religious texts. 
Botanical Facts - Basil is a hot weather plant, which is why we grow ours in the greenhouse, and this year it is amazingly early. It likes nighttime temperature above 60 degrees. It is an annual and grows in varieties from dark green to dark purple. 
Culinary Uses - Basil is often associated with Italian cooking, especially in tomato sauces and pesto. Used fresh it makes a wonderful accompaniment to salads and caprese.


Another Bite - From the Chef:

Napa cabbage will work in almost any recipe for green cabbage, but it’s more tender and has a milder flavor. Use in an Asian slaw as a side dish or to give color and crunch to a bahn mi sandwich.

Asian Slaw: Combine shredded cabbage with shredded carrots, sliced snow peas, and thinly-sliced green onion. Toss with the following vinaigrette from food writer Mark Bittman.

Asian Vinaigrette: 1/3 cup of peanut oil, 2 Tablespoons of rice vinegar, 1 teaspoon of soy sauce, ½ teaspoon of toasted sesame oil, salt and pepper to taste.

CSA Tip of the Week: 
Use the most perishable items (lettuces, blossoms, very ripe tomatoes…) on the first day or two. On the last day, take whatever is left and roast - serve over rice or grains and top with a fried or poached egg. Or make a light soup by sautéing the remaining vegetables in olive oil and stirring in some chicken or vegetable broth and some cooked beans.


 The boys slept in their hammocks in the woods this week and were woken by this Barred Owl and his call - "Who cooks for you? Who cooks for you?"

The boys slept in their hammocks in the woods this week and were woken by this Barred Owl and his call - "Who cooks for you? Who cooks for you?"

 The Western Tiger Lilies are blooming in the woods. This plant is a giant - it has 12 blossoms on in it and stands more than three feet tall. 

The Western Tiger Lilies are blooming in the woods. This plant is a giant - it has 12 blossoms on in it and stands more than three feet tall. 


In the middle of growing season it is nice to have a rainy day to stop and remember why we are doing this farming thing. We love growing good food and connecting with our community through the food we grow. We always enjoy talking with our CSA members and customers at pick-up and the markets! Stop by and say hello!

Your SVF Farm Team