Pure and Simple

 Duck eggs are a fairly recent addition to our farm and I was excited to experiment with them, having long heard that they are exceptionally rich. Vanilla ice cream seemed like the perfect way to highlight their qualities, especially their deep golden yolks. Some years ago, it became almost impossible to find pure ice cream at the supermarket; to my knowledge, there is only one national brand left that does not contain carrageenan, xanthum gum, or other additives and stabilizers. The move was supposedly to meet customer preferences for a perfectly smooth product, but I have my doubts. Wanting frozen custard without the weird stuff, I started making it. It's simple enough that it was a once a week task all last summer to go along with the blackberry cobblers and fruit pies. Using duck eggs made it even richer and more golden, but you can use chicken eggs and either is better than anything you can buy. You'll need an ice cream maker; mine is a Cuisinart that I've had forever.  Vanilla Ice Cream   2/3 cup sugar ,  2 large chicken eggs  (our duck eggs were only slightly larger than the chicken ones, so I used two, but if yours are very large, use one or one whole, plus one yolk...someday I will weigh them to get a precise amount),  2 Tablespoons all purpose flour, 1/4 teaspoon salt, 1 2/3 cups whole milk, 1 cup heavy cream, 2 teaspoons vanilla extract  (I also used the seeds from one vanilla bean in the photo above).  Mix the sugar, beaten eggs, and flour together in a bowl. In a medium saucepan, heat the milk on low until beginning to steam. Pour the egg mixture into the milk and stir frequently, keeping the heat low. You'll notice after a while that it turns from very liquid to slightly thicker; be very careful to not let the mixture boil or you will have creamy scrambled eggs. Remove from the heat when it thickens slightly and pour through a sieve into a 4-cup measuring cup or bowl. Stir in the cream and vanilla and allow to cool completely before pouring into your ice cream maker and freezing according to the manufacturers instructions.

Duck eggs are a fairly recent addition to our farm and I was excited to experiment with them, having long heard that they are exceptionally rich. Vanilla ice cream seemed like the perfect way to highlight their qualities, especially their deep golden yolks. Some years ago, it became almost impossible to find pure ice cream at the supermarket; to my knowledge, there is only one national brand left that does not contain carrageenan, xanthum gum, or other additives and stabilizers. The move was supposedly to meet customer preferences for a perfectly smooth product, but I have my doubts. Wanting frozen custard without the weird stuff, I started making it. It's simple enough that it was a once a week task all last summer to go along with the blackberry cobblers and fruit pies. Using duck eggs made it even richer and more golden, but you can use chicken eggs and either is better than anything you can buy. You'll need an ice cream maker; mine is a Cuisinart that I've had forever.

Vanilla Ice Cream

2/3 cup sugar, 2 large chicken eggs (our duck eggs were only slightly larger than the chicken ones, so I used two, but if yours are very large, use one or one whole, plus one yolk...someday I will weigh them to get a precise amount), 2 Tablespoons all purpose flour, 1/4 teaspoon salt, 1 2/3 cups whole milk, 1 cup heavy cream, 2 teaspoons vanilla extract (I also used the seeds from one vanilla bean in the photo above).

Mix the sugar, beaten eggs, and flour together in a bowl. In a medium saucepan, heat the milk on low until beginning to steam. Pour the egg mixture into the milk and stir frequently, keeping the heat low. You'll notice after a while that it turns from very liquid to slightly thicker; be very careful to not let the mixture boil or you will have creamy scrambled eggs. Remove from the heat when it thickens slightly and pour through a sieve into a 4-cup measuring cup or bowl. Stir in the cream and vanilla and allow to cool completely before pouring into your ice cream maker and freezing according to the manufacturers instructions.